Reflexive verbs

Reflexive verbs are verbs that are used together with a reflexive pronoun. That pronoun reflects back on the person doing the action (i.e. the subject of the sentence). 

Reflexive verbs are much more common in German than in English, and most have non-reflexive English equivalents, for example:

  • sich beeilen – to hurry
  • sich erinnern – to remember
  • sich langweilen – to be bored
Verb Reflexive pronoun
ich freue mich
du freust dich
er, sie, es freut sich
wir freuen uns
ihr freut euch
sie, Sie freuen sich

Exercise 1

Exercise 2

If there is an accusative object, the reflexive pronoun is used in the dative case.

Ich putze mir die Zähne.

Ich kann mir das nicht vorstellen.

Ich gebe mir Mühe.

The dative form is different only in the first and second person singular.

Verb Reflexive pronoun Accusative object
ich wasche mir die Haare
du wäschst dir die Haare
er, sie, es wäscht sich die Haare
wir waschen uns die Haare
ihr wascht euch die Haare
sie, Sie waschen sich die Haare

Exercise 3

Exercise 4

Note that when referring to parts of the body we often use the definite article and a reflexive verb:

Ich wasche mir die Hände.

Er putzt sich die Zähne.

Sie kämmt sich die Haare.

Ich habe mir das Bein gebrochen.

Here are some sentences illustrating the position of the reflexive pronoun in the sentence:

Er verspätet sich jeden Tag.

Er hat sich jeden Tag verspätet.

Er wird sich jeden Tag verspäten.

Er will sich nicht jeden Tag verspäten.

Verspätet er sich jeden Tag?

Verspäte dich nicht jeden Tag!

Exercise 5

Exercise 6

Exercise 7

Interesting to know! There are two groups of reflexive verbs:

1. Verbs that are always used with a reflexive pronoun, for example:

Er beeilt sich.

Ich kümmere mich um die Tiere.

2. Verbs that exist as non-reflexive and as reflexive verbs, for example:

Ich wasche das Auto. – Ich wasche mich. Ich wasche mir die Hände.

Ich frage Tim, ob er kommt. – Ich frage mich, ob er kommt.

Exercise 8

Do we need a reflexive pronoun in these sentences?